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Lost in Lindsey

The Thoughts and Adventures of a Lincolnshire Polytheist

Book Review

Shared from my main blog.

rosemariecawkwell.wordpress.com/2017/06/19/review-the-crane-bag-by-joanna-van-der-hoeven/

Druidry isn’t my path but this book was really insightful. Definitely worth a read.

A review from my main blog

That I thought might be of interest to followers of this blog: Path of Paganism, by John Beckett.

Published By: Llewellyn Worldwide Publication Date: 8th May 2017 Edition: Paperback I.S.B.N.: 9780738752051 Price: $19.99 (US) Blurb The Path of Paganism provides practical advice and support for living an authentic Pagan life in our mainstream Western culture. Witches, druids, polytheists, and other Pagans will discover an experiential guide to the foundations and practices of these […]

via Review: ‘The Path of Paganism’ by John Beckett — Rosie Writes…

May Day weekend

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This image comes from the Fyrnsidu Facebook page, and the painting is by Bottocelli.

 

In Fyrnsidu belief this weekend ends the Eostre season with Blostmfreols, the flower festival. It’s a new holy day and for a discussion of the theory and history behind it, I direct you to the Larhus Fyrnsidu page linked to above.

For other pagans this weekend is the fire festival of Beltane, and also a time of May pole dancing. The May Day celebrations are separate in origin and history to Beltane festivals. Beltane is assumed to be ‘Celtic’ in origin, whereas May Day and May pole dancing in supposed to be more Germanic. It all got mixed up by Victorian antiquarians who were desperate for anything they could claim as prehistoric leftovers. The ribbon dances around May poles are Victorian in origin.

The festivals celebrate the burst of life that usually accompanies the beginning of May, even if it’s a bit chilly at the moment, and I’m pretty sure we’re going to get another downpour later.

May Day, the public holiday, has a different origin, in workers strikes and demands for shorter working days, paid holidays and safer working conditions.

All these are valid reasons to celebrate this weekend.

I’m going to Spirit of the Marsh Festival tomorrow with a friend. It’s a weekend festival in Lincolnshire of talks, workshops and music, from Friday until Monday morning. Day and evening tickets are available. I particularly want to go to a talk by Pete Jennings about medieval elves. I intend to sample the wares of Veganic Kitchen too.

On Thursday my fruit and veg delivery came with some plants I’d ordered. Green Futures Grimsby is a local social enterprise, growing and supplying fruit and veg to local people, selling plants at a reasonable price and providing work experience to the socially disadvantaged. They’re good people who extend me credit. I ordered a few different plants but only the broad and french beans, two sweet peppers and a pack of pansies arrived. They were out of runner beans and something happened to my tomatoes but they will be delivered with my next order.

I planted them all out this afternoon, hopefully they should bed in and I’ll have a selection of veg later in the year, and some pretty flowers for now. The tree seeds the Woodland Trust sent me are coming on nicely in their tray, I’ll have to pot them on soon. The sunflower seeds I was given at the Abus Coritani Ostara ritual in March are starting to come through in their pot, only two of the five at the minute.

In other gardening activities, I turned my compost bins. I have three garden bins, cheap ones from Poundstretchers, that are collapsible. When I got them I put some holes in the bottom for drainage and fill them with garden and kitchen waste. Every six months or so, when the waste has composted down to about half, I tip one of the bins into another and start refilling the empty bin. I have two bins three-quarters full and one with a layer of stuff I pulled out of the front garden this afternoon so I could plant my pansies. There are potatoes growing in one of the full bins, probably from an old potato that got thrown out last year.

I’m not the greatest gardener but I get by.

Have a good weekend.

 

Glade Eastertid

It’s official. We’ve reached the full moon in April and Easter has begun. Different people celebrate for varying amounts of time. I think I’ll keep my Easter decorations up until May Day.

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We had some lovely weather over the weekend, up into double figures. There were the first BBQs of the year (I smelt them from a distance) and I ate in the garden.

Today I’ve had a bit of a tidy up in the back garden, dressed my alter with fresh flowers from the from garden and planted some sunflower seeds in a pot to get them started.

Nothing exciting but it words for me. Going now, out of spoons.

Rosie

Spring Equinox

Blessings, and all that, to people who celebrate. I don’t.

I went to a ritual with the local druid and pagan group yesterday, it was short and sweet, and followed by coffee in the cafe. There was mini eggs and mead, and a little gift of sunflower seeds and felt bunnies.

We got heckled by a passing Christian who wanted us to know that his prophet had risen, presumably from a Sunday morning lie-in. I’m being facetious, of course. I know for Christians it’s Lent. It was very rude of the heckler to try to impose his beliefs on us, we were doing no harm and in a public place.

The place in question was Julian’s Bower, a turf maze in Alkborough, Lincolnshire, that overlooks the confluence of the Trent, Ouse and Humber. The weather was windy and there were bursts of heavy rain on our way there, but the wind dropped once we started and the rain held stopped in plenty of time for the ritual.

I enjoy going to these rituals, not necessarily because they resonate with me, but because it’s nice to get out and meet up with like-minded people. I find the format a little too generic; casting circles, calling elements and directions, and some of the references are clearly made for the American market. It can throw me right out of the mood when I’m in the Lincolnshire countryside listening to the rustle of birch leaves and blackbirds, and the call to the south is about turtles and volcanoes. I can’t get back into the feeling then, because my brain is picking apart the references.

My beliefs are rooted in the land, sea and weatherscape around me. Yesterday they were calling on the directions and elements for protection, and ignoring the Humber, a powerful wight, right there in front of us. I tried to apologise and add the wights of the rivers to the ritual in my head.

I also have a problem with calling the vernal equinox  ‘Ostara’. It is derived, via modern witchcraft, Wicca, etc. from Grimm, who derived it from the German word the Grimms claimed for April. Call the vernal equinox the vernal equinox!

Ostara is slightly related, linguistically, to Eostre (variations on this spelling exist) but in the wrong month! The Spring Equinox always falls in March – Hrethamonath, not April – Eostremonath. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. Naming a festival after one goddess in the month of another goddess is disrespectful. The honouring of Eostre doesn’t start until the full moon in April and lasts as long as you like. I’ve been reading a bit from the Fyrnsidu website, and they suggest May Day as the end of the period honouring Eostre.

I have written about this before, here.

I will return to this subject at an appropriate time, next month.

I was asked yesterday, by a respected member of Lincolnshire’s pagan community why I chose the Norse path. I had to correct him straight away. Why do people always assume heathen = asatru? I told him my relationship to the land is paramount and that the Anglo-Saxon period attracted me from a young age as part of my obsession with history. It all just fits together. I am sure there are some Heathens who wouldn’t consider me heathen because I don’t necessarily worship the ‘major’ gods, but screw that.

Just sharing something

If you’re in the UK the Woodland Trust, based in Grantham, Linconshire, but with woodlands all around the the country, are offering free tree seed packs to people.

https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/seeds/

They hope to increase the tree cover in the UK from the current 13% by planting 64,000,000 trees by 2025. I encourage my readers in the UK to join in if you have the space or could plant tree somewhere unofficial. I have ordered my pack of seeds – they contain rowan, dog rose, alder buckthorn and holly seeds in compost ready to germinate. These trees provide food and shelter to many birds and small animals, and make a reasonable hedge. I plan to document the progress of growth and hopefully planting.

I’m cold: an update

Hi peeps,

I know, I’m not keeping this blog up to date at all. However, I have a legit reason for that. It’s cold, wet and generally manky and I’ve been focusing on studying for my MA, and haven’t been out anywhere. It’s quiet here today, if I ignore the snoring dogs and the whirr of the heating system.

Last Sunday I took a trip with a friend to Alkborough, where, from Julian’s Bower, a turf cut labyrinth one can see the confluence of the rivers Trent, Ouse and Humber. It is a very special place, and I’ve written about it before.

I did take pictures but I can’t find them right now. I’m having problems sending them from my tablet to my laptop. I’ll figure it out eventually.

After visiting Alkborough we went to Water’s Edge in Barton-Upon-Humber for a coffee, picnic and duck feeding. The wild fowl are starting to pair up and get aggressive with each other. It was very interesting and I recommend a visit if you’re in the area. It’s free to go in and the food is yummy. You get a good view of the Humber too.

Last Saturday was Imbolc for those who follow the eight-fold wheel of the year. I don’t. The weather isn’t getting any better, and the bulbs I planted are reluctant to put in an appearance. Some of my flowers have been blooming all year. The only sign that spring is on the way is the lengthening days. I’m waiting until Easter before I celebrate anything.

Better go, the studies call me.

 

Midwinter’s Eve

Tonight is the longest night, dark and cold. I’m wrapped up warm in my pjs and fleece dressing gown with my crochet. I’ve been watching iPlayer while crocheting but my fingers were aching so I stopped. There are quite a few programmes I need to catch up on. I’ve been in bed most of the day.

Image result for Yule

Continue reading “Midwinter’s Eve”

I got the blues

The winter blues.

Mostly caused by lack of money. I always have no money but at this time of year it’s even more pressing. I don’t spend much on Yule gifts, limiting myself to £5 per person and only getting for my very closest family and friends, but I do have to post parcels out to people which costs, amd I have to travel to visit people. Also costs. Tomorrow I’m going to Sheffield to see my friend there. She wants to see ‘Rogue One’ and I don’t not want to see it, so we’re going, and then to the Handmade Burger Co. after for dinner. This is an expensive afternoon, even with my student card.

I have plenty of food in, I did a big shop yesterday. Everyone’s gifts have been bought, the kids all have their £10 notes tucked in among the sweets, all but one parcel has been sent. The train tickets are paid for. I’ve put money away to pay my bills next week.

I’ll be okay.

Except, I’ve been refused PIP again and now I have to go through the hassle of appealing. I don’t think I’m up to it. I got the letter yesterday and I’ve been in a slump ever since. I’ve tried to be normal today and get on with my jobs but my back is hurting too much and I can’t find the motivation to even write the letter requesting a statement of reasons. 

I’m supposed to be going to see a friend this afternoon but I don’t know if I want to get dressed. Spending the day in my pyjamas seems like an awfully good idea right now.
This post is entirely personal and has nothing to do with my beliefs. 

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