Why do Christian bloggers – and I mean for the most part American Fundamentalist or Evangelical Christians – insist on tagging their posts ‘pagan’, ‘paganism’ or ‘polytheism’?  I’m not referring to Christopagans by the way.

I have read a few of these posts and other than screaming about Catholics being not-Christians, they have nothing to do with paganism or the pagan blogging community. Unless they’re trying to convert people to their particular form of Christianity it seems rather ridiculous to tag something obviously aimed at fundie Christians as ‘pagan’. That might be the purpose, I suppose, as they seem to believe anyone who doesn’t follow their particular brand of Christianity is a pagan. ‘Seem’ of course if the operative word here; as I’m not part of their belief system how am I to know precisely how they see outsiders? It is possible to gain some idea from reading their blog post, and of course from reading the work of those who’ve ‘escaped’, or left the cult, but my interpretation is still mediated by my own prejudices – I’ve read enough to know how toxic fundamental Christianity can be to women and children (I review books, I get to read all sorts of stuff) so I’m unwilling to give them the benefit of the doubt and I give their pronouncements a negative inflection because of that.

I’m still not giving them the benefit of the doubt; the only purpose in tagging a blog post ‘pagan’, knowing that the majority of readers of that tag will be pagans of one sort or another, is to get your attempts to convert in front of the target audience – pagans – and try to convert us. Luckily, it’s usually only two or three a week and some are repeat offenders. I can scroll past them, although some can be jarring when you’re scrolling through a page of people talking about their experiences or rituals, or seasonal festivals, to have a ‘Christian’ screaming in ALL CAPS about something or other which is completely irrelevant to the majority of people looking at the posts tagged ‘pagan’ etc.

Anything to add?

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